Category Breeds

Choosing an American Bobtail
Breeds

Choosing an American Bobtail

The American bobtail may be short of tail, but she's long on personality and charm. With her untamed appearance, tractable temperament, and cute bobbed tail, fanciers say this breed is the cat's meow. Currently rare, the American bobtail is nevertheless gaining fans as word spreads about the bob. And if you fancy a made-in-America breed, the bobtail is as American as the Fourth of July.

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Breeds

Choosing a Chesapeake Bay Retriever

The Chesapeake Bay retriever, also known as the Chessie, has been around since the early 1800s. To fully understand the Chessie, one must understand the environment in which this breed was developed. History and Origin The Chesapeake Bay is on the East Coast of the United States. This region has exceptionally harsh and unforgiving winters.
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Breeds

Choosing a Shetland Sheepdog

The Shetland sheepdog is a popular small dog. Looking like a miniature collie, this dog is a wonderful family companion. History and Origin The Shetland sheepdog, also known as the Sheltie, is named after the island where he originated in the 1700s. The Shetland Islands are located northwest of the British Isles, between Scotland and Norway.
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Breeds

Choosing an English Setter

The English setter is one of three members of the setter family and is an excellent bird dog. The Irish setter is tall and originated in Ireland. The Gordon setter is the heaviest setter and was developed in Scotland. The English setter is the smallest with a stunning speckled coat. History and Origin The English setter is one of the oldest of the "gun dogs".
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Breeds

Choosing an Old English Sheepdog

The Old English sheepdog, also known as the bobtail, is a big shaggy teddy bear of a dog. He loves to romp and play with children but also enjoys some time alone. His shaggy coat requires lots of care or frequent trips to the groomer. History and Origin It is thought that the Old English sheepdog was developed in the early 1800s in southwestern England.
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Breeds

Choosing a Miniature Pinscher

The miniature pinscher is a big dog inside a little dog's body. He is energetic, entertaining and intelligent and is not a smaller version of the Doberman pinscher. History and Origin The miniature pinscher originated in Germany several centuries ago, and even though he looks like a small Doberman pinscher, he is not related.
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Breeds

Choosing a Brittany

The Brittany is the smallest of the French spaniels and excels as a retriever, pointer and tracker. The breed also makes a great friend and companion. History and Origin The Brittany, named for the French province in which the breed originated, has been known and bred in France for over 400 years. Based on artist renderings and tapestries from the 1600s, it seems these dogs were quite popular.
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Breeds

Choosing a Wetterhoun

The wetterhoun is an uncommon breed that was developed in the Netherlands initially to rid the area of otters. With a name meaning "water dog," this breed is also used to hunt water fowl. History and Origin The wetterhoun is a descendent from the extinct old water dog, which has contributed to several of the modern day spaniel-type breeds.
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Breeds

Choosing a Border Terrier

The border terrier is an agile and lively dog that only wants to please. The wiry coat gives them an appearance of being scruffy, which is one of the many endearing features of this little ball of energy. History and Origin The border terrier was originally developed in the mid 1800s in the Cheviot Hills, an area bordered by England and Scotland.
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Breeds

Choosing a Leonberger

Leonbergers are gaining reputation all over the world as a wonderful companion dog. They can be expensive to obtain, and most breeders are careful about who they will sell to, but the right owner will have a most loyal and affectionate companion in a Leonberger. The Leonberger is a member of the American Kennel Club's miscellaneous class in the Foundation Stock Service (FSS).
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Breeds

Choosing an Australian Cattle Dog

If you've ever seen a flyball or Frisbee competition, then you've probably seen an Australian cattle dog. Also known as blue heelers, Hall's heelers and Queensland heelers, Australian cattle dogs are brilliant and beautiful creatures. To watch a cattle dog run and jump is a magnificent sight to behold.
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Breeds

Choosing a Japanese Chin

As a dog that originally lived with Chinese aristocracy and eventually spent their days at the Imperial Palace, the Japanese chin is considered by many to be royalty. History and Origin The Japanese chin is a very old toy breed that, despite his name, is thought to have originated in China centuries ago.
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Breeds

Choosing a Kerry Blue Terrier

The Kerry blue terrier is often mistaken for a poodle but once you meet him, this feisty Irish breed will show you why he is an original. Hailing from southwestern Ireland, the Kerry blue terrier craves human companionship but isn't too impressed with other dogs. History and Origin The Kerry blue terrier has a long and proud Irish history.
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Breeds

Choosing a Polish Lowland Sheepdog

The Polish lowland sheepdog looks somewhat like a small version of the Old English sheepdog with his shaggy coat. Hailing from Poland, this dog is an excellent sheep herder and great family pet but can be a bit stubborn if not trained. History and Origin As the name implies, the Polish lowland sheepdog originated in Poland hundreds of years ago.
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Breeds

Choosing a Presa Canario

The Presa Canario, also known as the Canary Dog, is a massive, strong breed that is a natural guard dog and cattle herder. Not for the faint of heart, this dog has the potential to be a fearsome foe. History and Origin Native to the Canary Islands off the coast of Spain, the Presa Canario is a muscular dog with a strong personality.
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Breeds

Choosing an Irish Wolfhound

Despite facing near extinction in the 17th century, the Irish wolfhound has been the National Dog of Ireland for over 2,000 years. The largest and tallest of the galloping hounds, this breed makes an excellent companion dog, but their life expectancy - 6 to 8 years - is short. History and Origin The Irish wolfhound is an ancient breed used by the Celts nobility for hunting wolves and the extinct Irish elk.
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Breeds

Choosing a Briard

Thought to originate from the Province of Brie, in France, the Briard was originally developed to protect against wolf attacks. Eventually, they became beloved pets and herding dogs. History and Origin As one of the oldest working dogs known, the Briard (pronounced bree-ARD) has a rich history. The Briard is recognized in some circles as the Chien Berger de Brie, or the Shepherd Dog of Brie.
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Breeds

Choosing a Saint Bernard

The Saint Bernard, savior of the Swiss Alps, is one of the most readily recognized dogs. Though the legend of the St. Bernard's devotion to rescuing people stranded in the Alps is true, the brandy barrel around his neck is just a myth. History and Origin As with most breeds, the true origin of the St.
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Breeds

Choosing a Gordon Setter

The Gordon setter is the largest, heaviest and slowest of the setter breeds. This tough dog is built to work all day. History and Origin The Gordon setter, once called the Gordon Castle setter, was originally developed in Scotland in the 1600s and called the black-and-tan setter. The Gordon setter was used as a Scottish gun dog that tracked and pointed small gaming birds.
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Breeds

Choosing a Balinese

Named for the graceful dancers of the Island of Bali, the Balinese is perfect for those who want a companion with the personality and svelte styling of the Siamese and the luxuriance of a semi-long soft-as-ermine coat. And since the fur has no downy undercoat, this breed doesn't require the upkeep that some longhaired breeds need.
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Breeds

Choosing a Redbone Coonhound

The redbone coonhound is a beloved raccoon hunting dog that is the only solid colored coonhound. Their beautiful red shiny coat led to their name. History and Origin The redbone coonhound was developed in the southern American state of Georgia in the 1800s likely from foxhounds and bloodhounds. At that time, many raccoon hunters had red dogs with unknown lineage that were excellent in tracking and treeing raccoons, referred to as redbones.
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